Enroll Now for Fall

by jnnielsen on September 13, 2017

As we start the new School year I thought it would be helpful to talk about the different stages  in regards to young children. In each stage of life ,according to Erikson, a person has a positive outcome or a negative outcome. For example an infant learns trust or mistrust in their early years. Trust is generated by the attention that a parent or caretaker gives to the young child. As their needs are met they can trust that they will continue to be met and their basic needs of food, comfort, sleep will be taken care of in a consistent pattern.  If they are not met consistently they develop a sense of mistrust.

In the next stage of early childhood, children learn autonomy vs. shame. Starting at he age of two  children want to start doing things on their own. They want to feed themselves, dress themselves, start using the toilet. they need to be assisted to do these tasks on their own. If they are not allowed to do this, they develop a sense of shame that they can’t take care of themselves to any degree. Children still need supervision but with an eye to the fact they want to test their limits. Most children know what their limits are, but for safety the parent or teacher needs to be ready to lend a hand.

Two years olds are learning to relate to their peers. As they play they start to develop relationships and learn what the norms of those relationships are.We don’t hit someone to get our way, we don’t grab a toy that we want. We don’t hit someone who is not cooperating with us.

Two year olds are learning words  and language structure so that relationships can be negotiated with language. They are also beginning to work on small muscle development. so that they can color or paint, turn the pages of a book, stack blocks, put together simple puzzles, and play with toys.

Three and four year olds are in a stage Piaget calls pre-operational taking a further step up that rung in cognitive ability. Play can include two or three children. The scenarios are more complex. They can put together multi-piece puzzles, play with a large block sets and create buildings and roads and play with more purpose. They can contribute more to story times with understanding the plot and contributing to the story.They enjoy dressing up and acting out different roles in their lives such as family roles, community roles, etc.

In this stage the chid still needs concrete objects to understand concepts and cannot figure things out with just their mental abilities. Children at this stage want the why of things. the world is a mystery. but they are on their way to discovery.As we start the new School year I thought it would be helpful to talk about the different stages  in regards to young children. In each stage of life ,according to Erikson, a person has a positive outcome or a negative outcome. For example an infant learns trust or mistrust in their early years. Trust is generated by the attention that a parent or caretaker gives to the young child. As their needs are met they can trust that they will continue to be met and their basic needs of food, comfort, sleep will be taken care of in a consistent pattern.  If they are not met consistently they develop a sense of mistrust.

In the next stage of early childhood, children learn autonomy vs. shame. Starting at he age of two  children want to start doing things on their own. They want to feed themselves, dress themselves, start using the toilet. they need to be assisted to do these tasks on their own. If they are not allowed to do this, they develop a sense of shame that they can’t take care of themselves to any degree. Children still need supervision but with an eye to the fact they want to test their limits. Most children know what their limits are, but for safety the parent or teacher needs to be ready to lend a hand.

Two years olds are learning to relate to their peers. As they play they start to develop relationships and learn what the norms of those relationships are.We don’t hit someone to get our way, we don’t grab a toy that we want. We don’t hit someone who is not cooperating with us.

Two year olds are learning words  and language structure so that relationships can be negotiated with language. They are also beginning to work on small muscle development. so that they can color or paint, turn the pages of a book, stack blocks, put together simple puzzles, and play with toys.

Three and four year olds are in a stage Piaget calls pre-operational taking a further step up that rung in cognitive ability. Play can include two or three children. The scenarios are more complex. They can put together multi-piece puzzles, play with a large block sets and create buildings and roads and play with more purpose. They can contribute more to story times with understanding the plot and contributing to the story.They enjoy dressing up and acting out different roles in their lives such as family roles, community roles, etc.

In this stage the chid still needs concrete objects to understand concepts and cannot figure things out with just their mental abilities. Children at this stage want the why of things. the world is a mystery. but they are on their way to discovery.

Piaget says that children learn these things through the process of assimilation and accommodation. This means the children take new information from their surroundings and assimilate into the experiences they have previously had. This expands their world view. It is important for children to have a variety of experiences and it is why we provide such a wide range of activities for them. But they still look at the world with an egocentric viewpoint. It is hard  for them to distinguish between different viewpoints.

Children have points of readiness. It is important to realize each child’s abilities and have appropriate expectations.

{ 0 comments }

Summer on the Farm

by admin on July 27, 2016

Nature is wonderful. It has variety, beauty, interest, change, cooperation. We teach children to look for variety among trees, insects, and types of animals. Then they can categorize them. We also teach them to look for beauty in nature, and think about what they may find in terms of art, and language. They also learn to take care of nature. They learn the needs of plants and animals, and that we are the guardians of our planet.

Celebrating 41 Years of Excellence!

  • Only minutes from the I-210
  • Located in beautiful Altadena, CA on a quiet street.
  • Near the top Lake Avenue where the air is clean and clear

Summer is upon us, and we have made plans for an exciting program! Here are the details:

The Summer on the Farm curriculum for 2017

Week 1: Recycling and saving the earth.

Week 2: Animal Care (horses, goats, chickens, rabbits).

Week 3: Gardening (eating healthy). How plants grow.

Week 4: County Fair- Contests, pie and pickles, relay races and blue ribbons.

Week 5: Appreciation of nature in art, poetry & stories (poet’s wall).

Week 6: Tree Identification (leaves and leaf projects).

Week 7: Insects role in nature- bug collecting categorizing.

Week 8: Native American philosophy of nature (one with the earth) drama.

If anyone has something to contribute let us know.

Special activities including tutoring for older children during nap.

We are looking forward to all the topics. The children have been having fun talking about recycling and fun things to do with recyclables.

Mid-summer we will have our Summer Fair, with contests, games, pony rides and a picnic/barbecue, and of course, parents will be invited.

Part time & Full time

(626) 798-8083

{ 0 comments }

The Perfect School

August 2, 2013

I recently viewed a film made in Finland about the Finnish educational system. Over the last seven years It has been ranked #1 by the UN’s rating scale for productive education. One of the things that the Finnish system demonstrates is that when children are actively involved in creating their own educational experience it creates […]

Read the full article →

CCH Wins Western Growers Foundation School Garden Grant

June 18, 2013

We are happy to report that we received a garden grant from the Western Growers Foundation’s School Garden Program,  and so we are full steam ahead with expanding our vegetable and flower gardens. We want children to understand the natural world and their part in it. We have received several enrollments for the fall and […]

Read the full article →

What Do We Want For Our Children?

March 3, 2013

What do we want for our children? Some of what we want is for them . . . to be happy to be smart to succeed to be problem solvers to begin the road to independence. The subsequent question must be, “How are these things best achieved? At Children’s Country House we believe that young […]

Read the full article →

The Chance to Change

November 12, 2012

We all hope to be given a chance to change. We also want to fit in. That’s the definition of socialization – to fit into our surroundings. We already belong to groups; families, churches, clubs, neighborhoods are groups in which we have to fit in or find our place. When enter a new group we […]

Read the full article →

The Pursuit of Happiness

August 12, 2012

This week I was watching the Olympics and there was a feature piece about an athlete from the nation of Bhutan. It’s a small nation in the Himalayas between India and China. As set forth by its leaders, a national goal is for the people to be happy. It is a small country and the […]

Read the full article →